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Best of British Produce – September

Best of British Produce– September

Salads: Cucumbers, Radish, Spring Onion, Wild Rocket, Round Lettuce, Raddichio, Little Gem, Pousse, Lollo Rosso, Oakleaf, Iceberg Lettuce, Cos Lettuce. Tomatoes (inc. Heritage), Watercress, Micro Cresses, Celery
Vegetables: Cauliflower, Swede, Beetroot, Carrots, Leeks, Red & Primo Cabbage, Chantenay Carrots, Broccoli, Piccolo, Celery, Mid Potatoes, Turnips, Green & Purple Curly Kale, Savoy Cabbage, Cavalo Nero, Broccoli, Peas In Pod, Broad Beans, Runner Beans, Bobby Beans, Courgettes, Purple Sprouting Broccoli, New Season Main Crop Potatoes
Fruit: Bramley Cooking Apples, Discovery Apples, Rhubarb, Strawberries, Raspberries, White Currants, Red Currants, Blueberries, Blackberries, Cob Nuts
Foraging: Wild Elderberries,

Best of British Produce – August

Best of British – August

Salads: Cucumbers, Radish, Spring Onion, Wild Rocket, Round Lettuce, Raddichio, Little Gem, Pousse, Lollo Rosso, Oakleaf, Iceberg Lettuce, Cos Lettuce. Tomatoes (inc. Heritage), Watercress, Micro Cresses, Celery
Vegetables: Cauliflower, Swede, Beetroot, Carrots, Leeks, Red & Primo Cabbage, Chantenay Carrots, Broccoli, Piccolo, Celery, Mid Potatoes, Turnips, Green & Purple Curly Kale, Savoy Cabbage, Cavalo Nero, Broccoli, Peas In Pod, Broad Beans, Runner Beans, Bobby Beans, Courgettes, Purple Sprouting Broccoli, New Season Main Crop Potatoes
Fruit: Bramley Cooking Apples, Discovery Apples, Rhubarb, Strawberries, Raspberries, White Currants, Red Currants, Blueberries, Blackberries, Cob Nuts
Foraging: Wild Elderberries,

Best of British Produce – June

Best of British – June

Salads: Round Lettuce, Raddichio, Little Gem, Pousse, Lollo Rosso, Oakleaf, Iceberg Lettuce, Tomatoes (inc. Heritage), Watercress, Micro Cresses
Vegetables: Cauliflower, Swede, Beetroot, Carrots, Leeks, Red & Primo Cabbage, Chantenay Carrots, Broccoli, Piccolo Parsnips, Celery, Cornish Mid Potatoes, Turnips, Green & Purple Kohl Rabi, Savoy Cabbage, Cavalo Nero, Purple & White Sprouting Broccoli, Curly Kale, Asparagus, Wild Asparagus, Peas In Pod
Fruit: Bramley Cooking Apples, Conference Pears, Braeburn Apples, Rhubarb, Strawberries, Raspberries.
Foraging: Wild Garlic Leaf, Nettles

CSL Market Report 25th August 2015

CSL Fruit & Vegetable Market Report 25th August 2015

The Potato main crop harvest has well and truly started now and all potatoes are new season so the initial new season rise in prices have eased and are stabling. English Primo cabbages are a good size and value for money. Unfortunately the same cannot be said for Cauliflowers, the prices has increased and the sizes are smaller as growers struggle with demand and are picking early.English Broccoli & Purple Sprouting Broccoliare both good at the moment and down in price too.
There’s not much to choose from on the Wild mushroom front and prices are on the dearer side. English Root crops too are still a bit on the pricey side for this time of year. Cucumber prices have rocketed as there is a supply shortage. Tomato prices have risen too.
Italian William Pears have started, so too have early English Conference PearsDiscovery Apples are still the only early English Apple but other varieties will be available imminently. Spanish Peaches & Nectarines are still good but the Water Melons are getting more expensive. English Plums are in full swing and and quality is good. Satsumas are coming to an end and we’ll have to move onto the dearer Nardicotts initially. Damsons are available now too.

English Discovery Apples

English Discovery Apples are best known because it is one of the earliest apples to crop in the UK. Cropping time is usually mid to late August and lasts for about a month into September.
Discovery Apples are hard and crisp with lots of juice and has an acidic come sweet flavour which appeals to most people.
The skin colour is mainly red with a green/yellow background and the flesh is a pale yellow.
They are at their best when eaten fresh from the tree as Discovery Apples cannot be stored and ideally should be eaten within a week, as after that the eating quality deteriorates quickly. They should always be stored in a fridge until eaten and not left in a fruit bowl.
One of it’s bonuses is that they are great for making apple juice and cider and enthusiasts can start early in the season. Order yours now while their at their best.

The origin of the English Discovery Apple is believed to be a cross between Worcester Pearmain & Beauty of Bath. It was created by a grower called Mr Drummer around 1949 in Langham, Essex. It was renamed Discovery in 1962. By 1980 Discovery had become the main early English variety.

 

Discovery TREE

English Discovery Apples

English Discovery Apples are best known because it is one of the earliest apples to crop in the UK. Cropping time is usually mid to late August and lasts for about a month into September.
Discovery Apples are hard and crisp with lots of juice and has an acidic come sweet flavour which appeals to most people.
The skin colour is mainly red with a green/yellow background and the flesh is a pale yellow.
They are at their best when eaten fresh from the tree as Discovery Apples cannot be stored and ideally should be eaten within a week, as after that the eating quality deteriorates quickly. They should always be stored in a fridge until eaten and not left in a fruit bowl.
One of it’s bonuses is that they are great for making apple juice and cider and enthusiasts can start early in the season. Order yours now while their at their best.

The origin of the English Discovery Apple is believed to be a cross between Worcester Pearmain & Beauty of Bath. It was created by a grower called Mr Drummer around 1949 in Langham, Essex. It was renamed Discovery in 1962. By 1980 Discovery had become the main early English variety.

 

Discovery TREE