Best of British Produce – November

Best of British – November

Salads: Round Lettuce, Raddichio, Little Gem, Pousse, Watercress.
Vegetables: Cauliflower, Leeks, Swede, Beetroot, Carrots, Parsnips, Brussels Sprouts, Leeks, Red & Primo Cabbage, Chantenay Carrots, Celery, Mid Potatoes, Broccoli*, Turnips, Green & Purple Kohl Rabi, Savoy Cabbage, Cavalo Nero, Purple Sprouting Broccoli, Curly Kale.
Fruit: Bramley Cooking Apples, Comice Pears, Conference Pears, Russet*, Braeburn & Cox’s Apples, Raspberries.
Foraging: Sloes.

*coming to an end

Fruit & Vegetable Market Report November 13th 2015

Fruit & Vegetable Market Report November 13th 2015

We had our first samples from Growing Underground, the unique farm 33 metres under Clapham High Street in Transport for London Underground tunnels used in the blitz to protect people. We will be distributing free samples to our customers over the next couple of weeks as the guys down there perfect their growing schedule.
Prices in general seem to be a bit easier this week as Spanish Tomatoes, Aubergines andPeppers are all cheaper. Green Courgettes have been ruthlessly dear lately, but even they are starting to ease in price although the Yellow Courgettes are still expensive and poor quality. There are Bobby Beans from Egypt now available but Kenyan Mange-Toute & Sugar Snap are up in price. English Cauliflower & Broccoli are good value and the Purple Kohl Rabi from B.E. Bransden in Surrey looks great. Potato prices are creeping up and we’ve had a price increase onPar-Fried Chips.
Dutch Indoor Rhubarb is very good but prices are steep. Spanish Clementine’s are tasting good and reasonably priced so too areBrazilian Galia Melons, unfortunately the Water Melons remain pricey. Spanish Lemons are now coming down in price and Lychees are now available but there are still no Cherries, orApricots yet.

Matts Life 23rd October 2015

Matt – The ultimate Salesman…or not?

It can’t be said that Matt doesn’t take his role as ‘Super Salesman’ seriously as on a recent lead he had from the canteen of ‘Transformation’ the home of Transvestite transformation he dressed accordingly and I managed to get a picture of the dress rehearsal before he went. Unfortunately, I think he had a hidden agenda as their based in Manchester and we don’t deliver that far!!
Has he told his Fiancée?

Custard Apples

Custard Apples

‘Custard Apple’ aka ‘Cherimoya fruit’ which visually isn’t exactly captivating, it’s more like something out of The Flintstones rather than an exquisite fruit. But don’t let its pre-historic appearance put you off. Slice open a Cherimoya and you will discover an awesome fruit, ivory, toffee custard-like flesh, which some say has a mango type fragrance. A ripe cherimoya, like a ripe avocado, should yield to gentle pressure and will usually have brown blemishes on the skin when ripe. Once ripe, cherimoyas can be refrigerated for 1-2 days, but they will lose their flavour if kept longer. They are best eaten as soon as they reach full ripeness, their flavour is most intense when eaten at room temperature or just slightly chilled. Custard Apples are full of vitamin C anti-oxidants, which helps to combat many diseases and also enhances the immune system. Custard apple is abundant with potassium, magnesium and contains vitamin A, calcium, copper, fibre and phosphorous. It has high calorific value, able to provide sustained energy and delicious in nature.
CUSTARD APPLES ARE AVAILABLE NOW

Fruit & Vegetable Market Report October 27th 2015

Fruit & Vegetable Market Report October 27th 2015

It’s widely thought that Halloween originated in the USA, but not so…. A roguish Irishman known as Stingy Jack, who tricked the devil was doomed to wander the earth for all eternity with only an ember of hell-fire to light his way. Forward to the 1800s and people were applying the name “jack-o’-lantern” to a homemade object more commonly known before that as a “turnip lantern”. Irish immigrants brought the tradition to America, home of the pumpkin, and it became an integral part of Halloween festivities. Which brings me to the current day and despite the short supply of Pumpkins this year, we’ve managed to secure them in 3 sizes, sm, med & large. This common orange variety of Pumpkin is not the best tasting by far so we have many other varieties available (call us for prices). Chantenay Carrots now do a Heritage Mix and its very good and worth a try. Parsley root is now available for those asking.
There are now plenty of the cheaper Chinese Chestnuts available. Brussels Sprouts are plentiful, so too is the choice of Wild Mushrooms around. Peruvian Asparagus has eased in price, so too has English Broccoli & Cauliflower. The Spanish Peppers are now replacing the Dutch and prices are easing, but Spanish Aubergines remain the same.
The Spanish Okitsu Satsumas are now tasting better and are a cheaper replacement for the now finished Nardicots. Despite moving onto Spanish Lemons, demand is strong and prices remain dear. All Berries have jumped in price and are quite expensive. English Comice & Conference Pears from J.G. Piper in Kent eat well and are reasonably priced. Now’s a good time to buy to make Quince Jelly as we have some good French ones available. Still no Kaffir Limes, Curry Leaves & Lychees. Supplies of Turkish Figs are now thinning out so expect prices to rise. Cherries are now on the market but prices are steep.