Wild Rowanberries

If you’re into your Foraging, Rowanberries (aka Mountain Ash) are now ready to pick. The stunning red berries are packed with vitamin A and C. They make fabulous jellies to serve with the upcoming game season, roast lamb or venison. They are best picked as late as possible but before the blackbirds and thrushes get to them. Commonly found in rural hedgerows and footpaths. They are easily spotted in the autumn with their plentiful clumps of red berries. The fruit is sour rather than sweet and has a unique flavour, making it a useful ingredient for far more preserves than just the popular Rowanberry Jelly.
The only use for consuming wild Rowanberries in their fresh raw state comes from Roger Phillips in his book ‘Wild Food’ in which he suggests squeezing the juice out of the berries to use in gin in place of angostura bitters!

Unfortunately we don’t sell these at the moment.

Disclaimer: Never eat anything from the wild without first consulting an expert! Please forage responsibly. Educate yourself, and have fun.

CSL Market Report 25th August 2015

CSL Fruit & Vegetable Market Report 25th August 2015

The Potato main crop harvest has well and truly started now and all potatoes are new season so the initial new season rise in prices have eased and are stabling. English Primo cabbages are a good size and value for money. Unfortunately the same cannot be said for Cauliflowers, the prices has increased and the sizes are smaller as growers struggle with demand and are picking early.English Broccoli & Purple Sprouting Broccoliare both good at the moment and down in price too.
There’s not much to choose from on the Wild mushroom front and prices are on the dearer side. English Root crops too are still a bit on the pricey side for this time of year. Cucumber prices have rocketed as there is a supply shortage. Tomato prices have risen too.
Italian William Pears have started, so too have early English Conference PearsDiscovery Apples are still the only early English Apple but other varieties will be available imminently. Spanish Peaches & Nectarines are still good but the Water Melons are getting more expensive. English Plums are in full swing and and quality is good. Satsumas are coming to an end and we’ll have to move onto the dearer Nardicotts initially. Damsons are available now too.

English Discovery Apples

English Discovery Apples are best known because it is one of the earliest apples to crop in the UK. Cropping time is usually mid to late August and lasts for about a month into September.
Discovery Apples are hard and crisp with lots of juice and has an acidic come sweet flavour which appeals to most people.
The skin colour is mainly red with a green/yellow background and the flesh is a pale yellow.
They are at their best when eaten fresh from the tree as Discovery Apples cannot be stored and ideally should be eaten within a week, as after that the eating quality deteriorates quickly. They should always be stored in a fridge until eaten and not left in a fruit bowl.
One of it’s bonuses is that they are great for making apple juice and cider and enthusiasts can start early in the season. Order yours now while their at their best.

The origin of the English Discovery Apple is believed to be a cross between Worcester Pearmain & Beauty of Bath. It was created by a grower called Mr Drummer around 1949 in Langham, Essex. It was renamed Discovery in 1962. By 1980 Discovery had become the main early English variety.

 

Discovery TREE

Matts Life 14th August 2015

Matt’s off for his Summer hols and he’s hoping not to loose his Passport this time! However. I don’t know if you know, but Matt suffers from the occasional bout of stuttering and apparently he caused a stir in the Airport Bar the other day when he shouted back to his mate ‘Allah, Allah, Allah, Allah… have a Beer!

Matt, our Super Salesman is available on 07903 204675 or email matt@countysupp.com

Latest Newsletter

Latest News Letter 14th August 2015 

The 12th August known as ‘The Glorious Twelth’ is upon us again, meaning the start of the Grouse shooting season and unfortunately due to bad spring weather it’s not so glorious as there were fewer nesting birds. The start of the shooting season means a menu change for many and a chance to add some seasonal fruits to their savoury menus.
So we have several varieties of English Plums,the first of the English Apples in Discovery,which are great for juicing. If your into your foraging, Elderberries are starting to ripen and there are plenty of Blackberries in the hedgerows.
On the Market there are many good English Brassicas, including Cavalo Nero, Curly Kaleand Broccoli that has now eased in price. Purple& Green Kohl Rabi and Purple & Yellow Cauliflower are available. For customers wanting a good chipping Potato, were still buying theSpanish Agria Potatoes until the English New crop has matured in size and skin.
Barlotti Beans are expensive at the moment, so to are Kenyan Fine Beans.
English Cherries
are imminently ending, but all the English Berries are in full flow includingBlack Currants & Blueberries. Lemons &Oranges are still expensive and show no sign of getting cheaper any time soon.

To read all the articles in the news letter click on the link below

English Discovery Apples

English Discovery Apples are best known because it is one of the earliest apples to crop in the UK. Cropping time is usually mid to late August and lasts for about a month into September.
Discovery Apples are hard and crisp with lots of juice and has an acidic come sweet flavour which appeals to most people.
The skin colour is mainly red with a green/yellow background and the flesh is a pale yellow.
They are at their best when eaten fresh from the tree as Discovery Apples cannot be stored and ideally should be eaten within a week, as after that the eating quality deteriorates quickly. They should always be stored in a fridge until eaten and not left in a fruit bowl.
One of it’s bonuses is that they are great for making apple juice and cider and enthusiasts can start early in the season. Order yours now while their at their best.

The origin of the English Discovery Apple is believed to be a cross between Worcester Pearmain & Beauty of Bath. It was created by a grower called Mr Drummer around 1949 in Langham, Essex. It was renamed Discovery in 1962. By 1980 Discovery had become the main early English variety.

 

Discovery TREE

CSL Market Report 11th August 2015

Fruit & Vegetable Market Report 11th August 2015

The 12th August known as ‘The Glorious Twelth’ is upon us again, meaning the start of the Grouse shooting season and unfortunately due to bad spring weather it’s not so glorious as there were fewer nesting birds. The start of the shooting season means a menu change for many and a chance to add some seasonal fruits to their savoury menus.
So we have several varieties of English Plums, the first of the English Apples in Discovery, which are great for juicing, if your into your foraging, Elderberries are starting to ripen and there are plenty of Blackberries in the hedgerows.
On the Market there are many good English Brassicas, including Cavalo Nero, Curly Kale and Broccoli that has now eased in price. Purple & Green Kohl Rabi and Purple & Yellow Cauliflower are available. For customers wanting a good chipping Potato, were still buying the Spanish Agria Potatoes until the English New crop has matured in size and skin.
Barlotti Beans are expensive at the moment, so to are Kenyan Fine Beans.
English Cherries
are imminently ending, but all the English Berries are in full flow including Black Currants & BlueberriesLemons & Oranges are still expensive and show no sign of getting cheaper any time soon.